Marigold Klungkung





Tagetes Marigold is a genus of annual or perennial, mostly herbaceous plants in the sunflower family (Asteraceae). It was described as a genus by Linnaeus in 1753.

The genus is native to North and South America, but some species have become naturalized around the world.
The name Tagetes is from the name of the Etruscan Tages, born from the plowing of the earth. It likely refers to the ease with which plants of this genus come out each year either by the seeds produced in the previous year, or by the stems which regrow from the stump already in place.

The common name in English, "marigold", is derived from "Mary's gold", a name first applied to a similar plant native to Europe, Calendula officinalis.


The most commonly cultivated varieties of Tagetes are known variously as African marigolds (usually referring to cultivars and hybrids of Tagetes erecta), or French marigolds (usually referring to hybrids and cultivars of Tagetes patula, many of which were developed in France).


Depending on the species, marigold foliage has a musky, pungent scent, though some varieties have been bred to be scentless. It is said to deter some common insect pests, as well as nematodes. Tagetes species are hence often used in companion planting for tomato, eggplant, chili pepper, tobacco, and potato. Due to antibacterial thiophenes exuded by the roots, Tagetes should not be planted near any legume crop. Some of the perennial species are deer-, rabbit-, rodent- and javalina or peccary-resistant.

T. minuta (khakibush or huacatay), originally from South America, has been used as a source of essential oil for the perfume and industry known as tagette or "marigold oil", and as a flavourant in the food and tobacco industries. It is commonly cultivated in South Africa, where the species is also a useful pioneer plant in the reclamation of disturbed land.

The florets of Tagetes erecta are rich in the orange-yellow carotenoid lutein and are used as a food colour (INS-number E161b) in the European Union for foods such as pasta, vegetable oil, margarine, mayonnaise, salad dressing, baked goods, confectionery, dairy products, ice cream, yogurt, citrus juice and mustard. In the United States, however, the powders and extracts are only approved as colorants in poultry feed.

Marigolds are recorded as a food plant for some Lepidoptera caterpillars including the dot moth, and a nectar source for other butterflies. They are often part of butterfly gardening plantings. In the wild, many species are pollinated by beetles.

Source: wikipedia

Our road trip has made us opting for this detour! 😍




thank you all for stopping by and viewing the post...
xxx

8 comments:

  1. Aww lovely flower field! You look great, and Minnie matches the flowers!

    Marie
    The Flower Duet

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  2. Wow this flower field looks so perfect.
    I adore this eyecatchy yellow. Lovely.

    take a look at my BLOG and my INSTAGRAM

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  3. These flowers are so lovely. Flowers are always a pretty sight, but especially when they come in such a cheerful color.

    Kathrin | Polar Bear Style

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  4. the flowers are so nice
    x

    http://anoddgirl.blogspot.com.au

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  5. These photos are amazing, hun! I love the yellow all around, it is so beautiful! Happy Monday!
    XOXO,
    Vanessa
    www.WhatWouldVWear.com

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  6. thank you all for the lovely comments...
    xxx

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